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Bob Franklin, creator of Right Off The Bat®, tested the game by playing every game of the 1967 baseball season (alone and with friends, family, neighbors, baseball players, and strangers), including the Right Off The Bat® World Series. Although the winning and losing teams were not the same in the Right Off The Bat® World Series, and although the players did not rank in the same positions, the statistics were remarkably the same. The items below illustrate the comparisons between the League season and the Right Off The Bat® season.
You will note that the names of the players change in the statistics from the League to the Right Off The Bat®, but the numbers are remarkably similar.


Grand Slam Home Runs

The League marked 18 Grand Slam Homers. Right Off the Bat® marked 21 Grand Slams.

Home Run Leaders

For the League, Carl Yazstremski and Harmon Killebrew both hit 44 Home Runs. For the Right Off The Bat®, Yazstremski and Don Mincher both hit 39.

Top Three Batting Averages

Carl Yazstremski at .326, Frank Robinson at .311 and Al Kaline at .308 had the highest League batting averages. In the Right Off The Bat®, Dick McAuliffe at .329, Yazstremski at .306 and Jim Fregosi at .301 were the top three.

Top Three RBI Leaders

Highest RBIs (Runs Batted In) in the League were Carl Yazstremski at 121, Harmon Killebrew at 113, and Frank Robinson at 94. In the Right Off The Bat®, Carl Yazstremski checked in at 113, Don Mincher at 112, and Jim Northrup at 105.

Top Individual Runs Scored

The highest number of runs scored by individual players in the League were Carl Yazstremski with 112, Harmon Killebrew with 105, and Ceasar Tovar with 98. In the Right Off The Bat®, Dick McAuliffe scored 113, Carl Yazstremski 103, and Curt Blefary 98.

League Strike Outs

9,945 players were struck out in the League in 1967; 10,005 were struck out in the Right Off The Bat® for the same year.

League ERAs.

The overall ERA (Earned run average) for the League was 3.23 and for the Right Off The Bat® it was 3.54.

Wins by Top Three Pitchers

Jim Lonborg, Earl Wilson, and Dean Chance were the top three winning pitchers in the League with 22, 22, and 20 wins respectively. In the Right Off The Bat®, Tom Phoebus, Earl Wilson, and Denny McLain took top honors with 22, 21, and 19 respectively.

Strikeouts by Top Three Pitchers

Most strikeouts by pitchers in the League were 246 by Jim Lonborg, 236 by Sam McDowell, and 220 by Dean Chance. Right Off The Bat® pitchers Jose Santiago, Darrell Brandon, and Lee Stange struck out 233, 230, and 226 respectively.

Fewest hits per 9 innings by Top Three Pitchers

Pitchers in the League allowing the fewest hits in 9 innings were Gary Peters with 6.47, Dave Boswell with 6.55, and Joe Horlen with 6.56. Denny McLain, Tom Phoebus, and Gary Bell led the Right Off The Bat® with 6.14, 6.15, and 6.49.

Caption summaries of the seven game Right Off The Bat® World Series

The 1967 League World Series matched St. Louis (Cardinals, NL) and Boston (Red Sox, AL). The Cardinal's won the series in 7 games and it was called by Bill James, baseball historian, one of the best World Series in what he terms an "unmatched decade" for the World Series.

The Right Off The Bat® World Series pitted the Philadelphia Phillies against the California Angels the winners of the two pennants as determined by 28 years of playing the board game . The following is a run by run account of the series as actually played under often unusual circumstances, with differing game players, and recorded by Bob Franklin.

Game One

After an uneventful 1st inning California drew first blood scoring a run in the top of the 2nd inning to take a 1 to 0 lead. Philadelphia answered back scoring 3 runs in the bottom of the 2nd to go up 3 to 1. The Angels scored another run in the top of the 3rd to make it 3 to 2. The Phillies added 2 more runs in the bottom half of the inning to lead 5 to 2. However, California tied it up scoring 3 runs in the top of the 4th just to have Philadelphia push 4 more runs across the plate in the bottom of the 4th to take a 9 to 5 lead, The Angels got 1 across in the top of the 5th, but Rick Wise became the series 1st winner shutting them out the rest of the way. The Phillies continued their tremendous power display hitting a season record 7 homers as George Brunet was pulverized on the mound. Philadelphia also capitalized on two California errors and won the contest 17 to 6. The Phillies lead the series 1 game to 0.

Game Two

California once again jumped out in front scoring unanswered runs in the top of the 1st and 2nd innings to take a 3 to 0 lead. Jim McGlothlin was brilliant shutting out Philadelphia on just 1 hit through the first five innings. The Angels scored another run in the top of the 6th to go ahead 4 to 0. But in the bottom of the 6th the Phillies began chipping away, scoring a run to make it 4 to 1. They added another run in the bottom of the 7th and 2 more in the 8th to tie the game 4 to 4. Jim Bunning held California hitless for the last 3 innings. With 2 outs in the bottom of the 9th, Gene Oliver connected with a 2 run homer to win for Philadelphia 6 to 4. The Phillies now lead the series 2 games to 0.

Game Three

After 2 scoreless innings, again California got on the scoreboard first and out scored Philadelphia 2 to 1 in the 3rd and 2 to 1 in the 4th. The Angels also scored 4 unanswered runs in the 6th and 1 in the top of the 9th. Ricky Clark had a strong outing allowing just 2 runs on 4 hits and Jim Fregosi supplied the muscle going 3 for 5 with 4 RBIs. California had a 12 hit attack and capitalized on 2 Philadelphia errors. Larry Jackson went down in defeat as the Angels win 9 to 2. They now trail in the series 2 games to 1, and the series moves to California.

Game Four

California scored 4 runs in the bottom of the 2nd inning and never looked back. Jack Hamilton went right to work and shut down the Philadelphia hitters. He did not allow a run, striking out 9 batters and walking 3 in his 4 hit shutout. The Angels again capitalized on 2 Philadelphia errors, and Jim Fregosi once again supplied the muscle with a 2 run shot. California also scored an unearned run and added a couple more as they sent Chris Short to the locker room in defeat. The Angels win 7 to 0. The series is now tied at 2 games apiece.

Game Five

For the first time in the series, Philadelphia scored first with 1 run in the top of the 1st inning, capitalizing on a California error. However, the Angels came storming back in the bottom half of the inning on a 3 run smash by clean-up man Don Mincher. The Phillies scored in the top half of the 2nd inning and it stayed 3 to 2 Angels for the next 4 ½ innings on strong pitching from both sides until John Callison scored from 3rd on a wild pitch to tie it 3 to 3 in the top of the 7th. Philadelphia scored twice in the top of the 8th to take a 5 to 3 lead. California came back in the bottom of the 9th, on 2 runs and 3 hits to tie the game and send it into extra innings. Clyde Wright retired the side in the top of the 10th inning. Bobby Knoop tripled to lead off the bottom of the 10th and after 1 out, scored on Don Mincher's sacrifice fly to win 6 to 5. The Angels now lead the series 3 games to 2 making it 3 wins in a row after being down 2 games to nothing.

Game Six

Philadelphia now finds their backs against the wall trailing in the series 3 games to 2 after winning the first 2 games. It was a "must win, do or die" situation. With no score going into the bottom of the 2nd inning, California scored and took a 1 to 0 lead. Philadelphia answered in the top of the 3rd with 2 runs. It remained 2 to 1 Phillies, until the Angels tied it in the bottom half of the 5th inning. Philadelphia came right back with 2 more runs in the top of the 6th to go up 4 to 2 California scored 3 times in the bottom of the 6th to go ahead 5 to 4 The Phillies refused to die and pushed 2 more runs across the plate in the top of the 7th to take back the lead at 6 to 5. Rick Wise became the series first 2 game winner as he held the Angels down the rest of the way and Cookie Rojas frosted the cake with a 3 run smash in the top of the 9th and Philadelphia wins it 9 to 5. The series is dead even again at 3 games apiece. The series will move back to Philadelphia for the final game. Scheduled is a showdown between Jim Bunning and Jack Hamilton, both series winners. Bunning in the regular season was a 21 game winner and Hamilton is the owner of the only shutout in the series thus far.

Game Seven

California's Jim Fregosi wasted no time as he led off game seven with a single. Two outs later Don Mincher singled and Buck Rogers followed with a double driving in Fregosi to put the Angels on top 1 to 0. Tony Gonzalez led off with a triple in the bottom half of the inning, but Jack Hamilton got the next 3 batters without a run scored. Both teams went down in order in the 2nd. Fregosi again led off with a single in the top of the 3rd and with 1 out, scored on a triple by Ricky Reichardt to put California ahead 2 to 0. The score remained the same until the bottom of the 5th when John Callison singled and with 2 outs scored on a double by Gary Sutherland making it 2 to 1 Angels. It became a pitching duel between Bunning and Hamilton as had been expected until the top of the of the 8th when Bobby Knoop tripled with 1 out. After Ricky Reichardt struck out swinging, Don Mincher's second single of the game produced an RBI with Knoop scoring from 3rd to make it 3 to 1, California. Jack Hamilton proved once again to be too strong for the Philadelphia hitters, as he struck out 9, walked 1, and held the Phillies to just 1 run on 3 hits. The Angels pushed one across in the top of the 9th to close out the scoring as Jack Hamilton retired the side in order in the bottom of the 9th. California wins the world series after being down 2 games to none, and Jack Hamilton was selected series MVP. In his 2 games he pitched 18 innings, allowing just 1 run, 7 hits, struck out 18 batters and walked only 4. His earned run average was an astounding .50.

…Bob Franklin